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Archive for September, 2010

Alan Wake Review

September 23, 2010 Leave a comment

By Tom Dann

“Nightmares exist outside of logic, and there’s little fun to be had in explanations; they’re antithetical to the poetry of fear.” – Stephen King

Alan Wake is Remedy’s ode to Stephen King, and just about every twisty-turny pulp horror novel ever written. There are references to other literary giants, such as Lovecraft, as well as mystery TV shows such as Lost and The Twilight Zone. Alan Wake is a love letter to each and every writer who has produced a scary, supernatural horror story. It homages and utilises the cliches and genre conventions we expect. By creating something so rooted in supernatural-mystery literature and television, Remedy have created something new and unique, a flawed masterpiece. Read more…

Categories: Reviews

Playing the Dream

September 23, 2010 Leave a comment

By Blair Martin

(Warning – this article contains evidence of a grown adult getting a little excited…)

When I was kid I owned a Commodore 64. Even though it was 25 years ago, I still remember a lot of the games I played on it. One of them was The Hobbit, an adventure game based on the novel, consisting of pages of text and low-pixel pictures – the kind where you type ‘E’ to go east, or type ‘Kill Thorin’ to get your skull cleaved in two. For a seven year old it was quite difficult, and I even sat down a few times with a sheet of graph paper and attempted to draw a map as I went along. The furthest I ever got was being told, in blocky grey text, that I had been ‘burned to a crisp’ by Smaug, over and over again. Read more…

Categories: Essays

Dawn of War II: Chaos Rising Review

September 22, 2010 Leave a comment

By Tom Dann

Chaos Rising, like most modern games, is split into two very distinct game modes, which makes discussion of an overall experience problematic. The campaign mode will be most players first port of call, however, making it the best place to start. The story picks up shortly after the events of Dawn of War II, and sees the return of the six heroes from that game. The Aurelia Sector, home to the Blood Ravens Chapter of Space Marines, is witness to the reappearance of a long lost planet, along with a distress signal. What follows is an epic tale of betryal and corruption, unfolding through the eyes of the purest warriors in the 40K universe. Read more…

Categories: Reviews

Armchair Scholar – a brief look at History in Computer Games

September 20, 2010 Leave a comment

By Blair Martin

I recently watched the film ‘Hannibal’. It’s a fairly good film, but I remember it for something other than the clever plot, strong characters and guts on the pavement. One scene in particular stood out, a scene that produced in me the smug satisfaction that comes from knowing something that not many people know. In the scene, Dr Lector is conversing with Renaldo Pazzi. As the Doctor is very clever indeed, when he reveals he knows the history behind the Pazzi family name it comes as little surprise. Renaldo’s ancestor, Francesco de Pazzi, was hung from a third floor balcony after a massive conspiracy in 15th Century Florence; the Doctor asks if Renaldo has ever had any stigma attached to his name. ‘It’s never come up.’ the corrupt cop laughs. Because it happened more than 500 years ago – it’s ancient history. Read more…

Categories: Essays

Story Vs. Gameplay in Dead Space

September 16, 2010 2 comments

By Kob Monney

[This article contains spoilers regarding Dead Space’s ending]

Dead Space is, at times, a terrific survival/horror. However, the ending of the game left me in two minds about the effectiveness of a story within a game.  It made me wonder why we play games, is it for the story or the gameplay? I felt unsatisfied by the ending, something was amiss throughout my playthrough and it was only until the last cinematic that I could elucidate further on this problem in the form of a question.

Am I supposed to care? Read more…

Categories: Essays

Welcome to the Madhouse – Batman: Arkham Asylum

September 10, 2010 Leave a comment

By Tom Dann

The mind is an interesting thing. There are seven billion people in the world, and everyone’s mind is unique. The mind is capable of beauty or ugliness, simplicity or complexity. Most importantly to Arkham Asylum, the mind can also be damaged. Whether by a significant event in the persons life, or by anger from a perceived injustice, whether the mind was fragile in the first place or whether the person was literally born broken, Arkham Asylum probes these possibilities with fascination. Read more…

Categories: Essays

About Blue Sun Games

September 9, 2010 Leave a comment

The aim of Blue Sun Games is to provide a forum for gamers to discuss games in a different way: Too many websites rinse and repeat news stories, previews and reviews, with little engagement with the game as a text. Games are evaluated, but rarely engaged with as an artifact with deeper meanings. Read more…

Categories: About